Mall Terrorist Attack on Halloween

In October, 2001 e-mails began circulating claiming that terrorists are targeting malls on Halloween for their next terrorist attacks.

In the e-mail, a woman states that her friend's friend was dating a man from Afghanistan up until recently. He failed to show up for a date on 9/6/01 and she subsequently went to his home to discover that he had moved out.

The next day, she received a note from him telling her he wished he could tell her why he left and that he was sorry. He then begged her not to go on any commercial airplane flights on 9/11 or to any malls on Halloween. When the terrorist attack in the United States happened on 9/11, she contacted the FBI and turned over the letter.

With this e-mail hitting inboxes before Halloween, it raises fears and awareness that terrorists can and will strike at any time. Whilst it's possible there could be an attack on Halloween since it's a popular American holiday -- it's probably unlikely. The FBI states it has received no letter from a girl with an Afghan boyfriend as the e-mail claims and it is not a credible threat.

Mall-O-Ween Rumor

This hoax is similar to the Mall Terrorist attack as some of the claims are the same. Here's an e-mail fueling this rumor:

"Hi All

I think you all know that I don't send out hoaxes and don't do the reactionary thing and send out anything that crosses my path. This one, however, is a friend of a friend and I've given it enough credibility in my mind that I'm writing it up and sending it out to all of you.

My friend's friend was dating a guy from Afghanistan up until a month ago. She had a date with him around 9/6 and was stood up. She was understandably upset and went to his home to find it completely emptied. On 9/10, she received a letter from her boyfriend explaining that he wished he could tell her why he had left and that he was sorry it had to be like that.

The part worth mentioning is that he BEGGED her not to get on any commercial airlines on 9/11 and to not to go any malls on Halloween. As soon as everything happened on the 11th, she called the FBI and has since turned over the letter.

This is not an email that I've received and decided to pass on. This came from a phone conversation with a long-time friend of mine last night.

I may be wrong, and I hope I am. However, with one of his warnings being correct and devastating, I'm not willing to take the chance on the second and wanted to make sure that people I cared about had the same information that I did".

END

Notice how this is always a friend of a friend? Why is that the person involved is never someone you know or can confirm the information with? A hoax typically has only a first name, a first and last name of a person who can't be found, or no name (a "friend") at all.

Don't feed the hoaxes. With Halloween nearing, the emails are bound to begin circulating again. If you forward this story for entertainment purposes, indicate that it is a hoax. Otherwise, you will appear foolish.

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